Our Philosophy

      It wasn’t easy to clarify the way we want to lead our breeding. It was caused by lack of knowledge, as well as too much information from social media (unfortunately, many beginners are using these platforms as a source of information), and also the huge differences in other breeders’ opinion. It might be confusing for many beginners. That is the reason, why is it good to talk to many different breeders, get to know them, and to realize whose philosophy corresponds the most with yours. According to the saying “birds of a feather flock together”, we also found a group of breeders and owners whose opinion we agree with and we share their philosophy and ideas. Unfortunately, the Covid situation had crossed our path right in the beginning and we are referred to electronic communication only. We hope that these hard times will end soon and we will be able to take the opportunity and visit those these people in person. We believe, that it will have huge benefits for us, mainly because these people are really humble, with a lot of experience and knowledge, and are willing to selflessly share their “know-how” to us, also because everyone needs someone reliable to work and cooperate with. Our all life motto is “wish and you will be wished, give and you will be given” and we will follow this motto also in our breeding. 

      Currently, there are five dogs in our pack, two of them will never be used for breeding. We could have more dogs, time and space would allow us, but we have no interest for now in extending our pack. We have a bunch of different activities, that we do as a family, mostly our kids. The space that we would have for more dogs we rather keep for them. We think it’s selfish to force them to be interested only in our activities. We try to develop them in many different ways, extend their knowledge and skills, and show them the “world”. We don’t want them to blame us for denying their personal development because of our own interests. A bigger pack would make our hands have tied, and thus, when it is "just enough", we can enjoy their interest in breeding and farm activities.

      Our goal is to breed litters that will correspond as much as possible to the breed standard and the typical temperament. We also try to create an environment so that our dogs can focus on the original function and purpose of the breed – livestock guarding.

      We understand very well that the connection of two dogs that have been approved for breeding does not mean that such a connection will bring any benefit for the breed. After all, we feel that there are too many such thoughtless and unhelpful connections today. Therefore, in all our future matings, we will always pay attention beyond health to other factors that are very important to us. We try to be honest about the qualities of our dogs and admit their shortcomings. This makes it very easy for us to choose a potential stud male. The excessive use of an individual in breeding is also discouraging for us. Of course, there is also a difference between whether the dog has these litters primarily in its vicinity or in a wider area, and thus the gene pool is preserved. Temperament is also a very important criterion. Various fluctuations outside the typical temperament can adversely affect not only the ability of reproduction of the individual but also the offspring. This then carries the risk of passing on this non-standard temperament from the very beginning.

      Entering the "breeding world" opened our eyes. Not everything is as rosy as it often seems at first glance. Breeding is a financially demanding and time-consuming "hobby" and more than a hobby is more of a mission. When it reaches the level of gainful activity, the quality and benefits are lost and it very adversely affects the future of the breed.

      We try to maintain impartiality. We do not want to choose sides in conflicts that arose long before we decided to start our own breeding. We should not forget that breeding is primarily about dogs, and not about personal sympathies or antipathies. In the Czech Republic, the Pyrenean Mountain Dog breed is covered by two clubs with different conditions. One is more benevolent in one thing, the other in another. We do not consider the choice of transferring to the nother club for bad, people precisely do because of the conditions. It is a thing that is allowed by law or some rules and regulations. It is not the fault of individual people. We should look for the mistake somewhere above, especially in the fact that there are no uniform rules. If the "higher authorities" offer such an option, it is a personal choice for everyone whether they choose it or not. But we think that in the end, common sense and the conscience of the breeder, not to include an individual who is insufficient, should still prevail. Because it is not in our power to change the rules from day to day, we have no choice but to start by ourselves and lead by example, put personal disagreements aside and try to find a common path that will primarily benefit the breed.